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82,777 notes

feministsupernatural:

maymay:

“Repeat Rape: How do they get away with it?”, Part 1 of 2. (link to Part 2)

Sources:

  1. College Men: Repeat Rape and Multiple Offending Among Undetected Rapists,Lisak and Miller, 2002 [PDF, 12 pages]
  2. Navy Men: Lisak and Miller’s results were essentially duplicated in an even larger study (2,925 men): Reports of Rape Reperpetration by Newly Enlisted Male Navy Personnel, McWhorter, 2009 [PDF, 16 pages]

By dark-side-of-the-room, who writes:

These infogifs are provided RIGHTS-FREE for noncommercial purposes. Repost them anywhere. In fact, repost them EVERYWHERE. No need to credit. Link to the L&M study if possible.

Knowledge is a seed; sow it.

r

(via feminists-rage-in-texas)

18 notes

Patton Oswalt on a Lifetime Reading Stephen King -- Vulture

styro:

thulium:

I agree with everything he writes here. I read all those early-era Stephen King books starting when I was like 12 or so. What the hell? Stephen King books are not aimed at kids, I have no idea how I latched onto them. I have no idea why my parents let me read them. I guess they were just glad I was reading. But some of those scenes completely scared the bejeezus out of me, unlike anything I have ever read since.

I also read a shitton of Stephen King as a kid.  I reference IT every time my dog sniffs at a storm drain.  

In 8th grade a friend of mine was reading IT, and she would mark the weirdest/grossest passages and let me read them during math class. I have no idea what happens in that book or how it ends, but I know it’s weird and gross!

I read pretty much every single Danielle Steel book when I was 12. Not only did my parents let me purchase and read them, they let me read them DURING CHURCH. I think they were just so happy that their kid loved reading that they were blinded to everything else. Not that letting your kid read Danielle Steel is the worst thing a parent can do, but those books had a ton of sex (most of which I didn’t understand*), and the depictions of gender roles and sexual consent were pretty messed up.

*Example: Danielle Steel never used the word penis; she’d only say manhood or member or whatever. I understood the concept of how hetero sex worked, but I didn’t know any of Steel’s euphemisms, so I thought none of the characters were having actual sex with each other. 

28 notes

Let’s try this again.

icouldmakethat:

Hi! It’s been a long time since I’ve posted here with any regularity, for a few reasons:

  1. When I was updating this site on a regular basis, I was unemployed. I had plenty of time!
  2. Then I got a job making jewelry, and I loved that job so much. It was fun and creative and fulfilling and I thought, this is it! This is what I want to do. This is my future.
  3. A little over a year later, I got laid off. It was sad and frustrating and demoralizing, but I learned a very valuable lesson from it: working for someone else cannot ever be my “this is it.” Working for someone else can be fun and creative and fulfilling, and is certainly necessary for 90% of people on the planet (myself included, more on that in a minute). But I can’t let it be the thing that defines me, because when I work for someone else, it’s up to them to decide whether I’m there or not, and I need to be in control of the things that define me as a person.
  4. A few months after I was laid off, I did a successful Kickstarter to fund my own jewelry business. Which was great! It doesn’t make money yet, but I enjoy it and I feel good about its possibilities.

These days I split my time between my jewelry business, working from home doing web development for a company I like, and of course making things like usual. The web job is interesting and diverting without sapping all my energy, it pays the bills, and working remotely gives me more free time than I usually have when working for someone else. 

All of those things made me realize that there’s no good reason for me to be neglecting this website. I still make stuff, I have time to photograph that stuff and write about it for you. And I’ve really missed doing all that.

So let’s try this again, shall we? I’ll return soon with some good projects. Welcome back, everybody.

I’m back, you guys.

20,493 notes

If you are 35 or younger - and quite often, older - the advice of the old economy does not apply to you. You live in the post-employment economy, where corporations have decided not to pay people. Profits are still high. The money is still there. But not for you. You will work without a raise, benefits, or job security. Survival is now a laudable aspiration.

Quoted from Sarah Kendzior’s “Surviving the Post-Employment Economy

“In the United States, nine percent of computer science majors are unemployed, and 14.7 percent of those who hold degrees in information systems have no job. Graduates with degrees in STEM - science, technology, engineering and medicine - are facing record joblessness, with unemployment at more than twice pre-recession levels. The job market for law degree holders continues to erode, with only 55 percent of 2011 law graduates in full-time jobs. Even in the military, that behemoth of the national budget, positions are being eliminated or becoming contingent due to the sequester.

It is not skills or majors that are being devalued. It is people.”

Her work is frank, speaking of a reality I hope that will never be mine. At the same time, it gives me a strange comfort to know that I am not alone.

(via sextus—empiricus)

(via brownpau)

9 notes

hyenabutter:

You know how in movies there will be a scene where the hero or whoever is asleep in bed, and the bad guy will try to bump him off by having someone slip a cobra or a scorpion or some other deadly animal into the bedroom to do the dirty work? I guess on paper it seems like a great idea, but there are some serious holes in this sort of plan.
For one thing, animals are really unpredictable: you don’t know from one minute to the next what the hell they’ll do. Sure, you might get the snake into the room, but it’s just as likely to crawl under the dresser and not come out as it is to bite the victim. Probably more likely, really. Secondly, if you’re close enough to slip a deadly animal into the room, why not just go ahead and kill the person yourself? Unless the idea behind using the cobra or the venomous spider or whatever is to make the murder look like an accident, but what kind of idiot police detective is going to write off something so unlikely as just plain bad luck? I shudder to imagine a world where cobra attacks—in this country at least—become so common the cops don’t even think twice about marking my murder off as Just One Of Those Things. 

hyenabutter:

You know how in movies there will be a scene where the hero or whoever is asleep in bed, and the bad guy will try to bump him off by having someone slip a cobra or a scorpion or some other deadly animal into the bedroom to do the dirty work? I guess on paper it seems like a great idea, but there are some serious holes in this sort of plan.

For one thing, animals are really unpredictable: you don’t know from one minute to the next what the hell they’ll do. Sure, you might get the snake into the room, but it’s just as likely to crawl under the dresser and not come out as it is to bite the victim. Probably more likely, really. Secondly, if you’re close enough to slip a deadly animal into the room, why not just go ahead and kill the person yourself? Unless the idea behind using the cobra or the venomous spider or whatever is to make the murder look like an accident, but what kind of idiot police detective is going to write off something so unlikely as just plain bad luck? I shudder to imagine a world where cobra attacks—in this country at least—become so common the cops don’t even think twice about marking my murder off as Just One Of Those Things.